Understanding the Foreclosure Process

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Foreclosures have been steadily increasing over the past few months in most American cities. Some of the cities with the highest number of foreclosures include Atlanta, Los Angeles, Miami, Detroit, Phoenix and many others. There are many different reasons why homes go into foreclosure. One of the most important reasons today is the day so called sub-prime mortgage mess. This occurred because many banks relaxed their lending guidelines. A lot of people who would otherwise not be able to buy a home were able to buy a home over the past few years because of these relaxed guidelines.

Unfortunately, most of these people bought homes with mortgages that they could not afford to pay. A lot of these mortgages were adjustable rate mortgages. The payments on these loans were initially very low however, the loan payments increased dramatically as the interest rates adjusted upwards. So these homebuyers could not afford to pay and so had to go into foreclosure.

When a homeowner is not able to pay his or her mortgage, the bank may decide to take back the home. This is also called a foreclosure.

Different states have different guidelines on how banks can foreclosure on a property.

This process is very short and straightforward in the state of Georgia. It is much along that in many other states. There are two types of foreclosure processes: one is a judicial process, and the other is non-judicial. Some states like Georgia use the non-judicial foreclosure process. This non-judicial process is very fast. A homeowner in Georgia may lose their home in as little as 30 days if they fail to pay a mortgage on time.

The bank merely has to go to cost and declared that the mod gauge these view immediately. When this happens, the home owner may come up with the money in order to stop the foreclosure. This is very difficult because many of these home owners are already facing a lot all financial difficulties. The bank publishes a note these in the Loki newspaper that they are ready to foreclose on the home.

The bank is required by law to publish this no tears in the paper for at least four weeks before the actual foreclosure date. If the home owner does not come up with the money to pay the loan within this time the bank has the right to go to court and set a property at the court steps to the highest bidder. Some banks succeed in selling the home quickly, however most of them would end up buying back the property. This is now called an REO property.

The bank now recruits a real estate broker to list and sell their property to any interested buyers. These homes are initially listed at market value. The bank will eventually discount the property, if they are not able to sell it at fair market value. This represents a good bargain for a savvy home buyer. This savvy homebuyer really needs to work with a real estate agent who knows how to locate these discounted properties. And remember not all foreclosures are good deals.

About the Author: Eric Mabo

Eric Mabo is an Atlanta foreclosures Expert. He helps people find real estate deals

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This page contains a single entry by the boozwatt team published on January 13, 2008 7:58 PM.

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